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May 29, 2009
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Draftee Daffy Comparison 2 by NMartinez Draftee Daffy Comparison 2 by NMartinez
This is part of my personal cartoon lessons. I've taken an image from Bob Clampett's "Draftee Daffy" and tried copying it as accurately as possible. So far, I feel the shapes are drawn well, but the line of action and the eyes need a little work. I've posted some previous ones over at my blog. > [link]

Daffy Duck (C) Warner Bros.
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:iconcheesybear:
CheesyBear Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2014   Digital Artist
Wow, I just realized that you were one of the lucky few who got invited to join the "Cartoon Fundamentals" blog.  I saw this one posted.  I like the blog.  I'm currently on lesson 2 (getting it accurate and memorizing them, especially those difficult angles, are a pain- it's tough stuff).  However I noticed that there has been no recent activity there and most of the members weren't even contributing, so I'm wondering if everybody quit.  It's a shame if they did, because I think it had some potential to train good artists of today to great artists of tomorrow.  I'm curious to find out what happened and to know how your experience there was.  I wanted to join so bad but from what I heard, you had to be invited by some friends of John K. on his blog.  Anyway, I think Cartoon Fundamentals is a good place to start for every cartoonist and I wonder if it helped you at all (and also how much time it took for you to complete the lessons, or if you did all of them at all).  Thanks, and happy drawing!
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:iconnmartinez:
NMartinez Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2014  Professional Filmographer
It was really fun being on "Cartoon Fundamentals," especially when I gained very helpful feedback. I was invited initially, but I don't know if they were friends of John. I had to leave once my schedule started piling up, and I was disappointed to see the site basically abandoned. I assume that everybody dropped out for the same reason.
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:iconcheesybear:
CheesyBear Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2014   Digital Artist
Oh that's a shame, but I'm glad it's still up for other artists to use to their benefit (I think the book is the best way to go if one wishes to be a cartoonist), and I'm also glad that although I couldn't find the original edition anywhere (I saw one page going for over a thousand bucks) (someone was nice enough to share scans of it on a webpage).  It sounded like a nice experience, because you were working with individuals who shared the same passion and got lots of helpful tips and critiques (I learned a lot of things from the blog).  The cleaned-up blue pencil version of "Draftee Daffy" posted on the page was immaculate and damn near-perfect.  Getting it so accurate is a very difficult thing to do, but you did it.  I envy your technique and think you're a really great artist. I think I'm going to steal the technique, in which you use sighting lines to make sure the proportions are accurate.  Thanks for the inspiration!
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:iconnmartinez:
NMartinez Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2014  Professional Filmographer
I'm glad you like how I handle these studies. I certainly got a lot out of the notes I make for myself along the way. 
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:iconcihankaygusuz:
CihanKaygusuz Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2010
I love it! :love:
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:iconnmartinez:
NMartinez Featured By Owner Jan 28, 2010  Professional Filmographer
Thanks! :)
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:iconinkskin:
Inkskin Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2009  Hobbyist General Artist
Do you use a Daul Rod or your pencil to exact the proper proportions?
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:iconnmartinez:
NMartinez Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2009  Professional Filmographer
I use a pencil.

During the process, I'd analyze the original drawing with a horizontal and vertical lines. In my drawing, I'd put one of the lines along the edge of a certain shape to see where things align or where certain points begin. But not before putting in the all important line-of-action, which obviously gives the drawing its general direction and size. I would continue with it and make any adjustments, and then, of course, it goes to Photoshop to see if they really are accurate.

BTW, blue or red pencil is a lot better for Photoshop, since you could tell the lines apart better.
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